Background

In this visual project, we decided to tell you a story from a region around Kalemie. This is also the region where Ine's family lived, which we discuss in our previous blog post.

A lot of these stories, or legends, have been translated from Ki Swahili to Dutch by Ine's grandfather (W. Van de Voorde). This translation is interesting because at the time there was no official translation or dictionary.

Moreover, it is quite unique that we can still tell this story, since most of his work has been stolen. This is one of the stories that was still published in the magazine ‘Ohee’. Some of the others appeared in little books sold by students to pay for their education. This is also the reason why Ine's grandfather did not go to court with the theft, as he considered it more important that these youngsters could attain education.

African Legends
For more African legends, visit the African Heritage blog.

A blog post by Hannah Kay and Ine Van de Voorde

Visual format

For this ethnographic assignment we chose to transform this old legend into a more contemporary and accessible format: an Instagram Story. 

We were inspired by the fact that we received the story through Whatsapp, a social media platform. Consequently, we wanted to stick to a similar platform. Instagram fulfilled the requirements for representing visual materials. 

The Instagram Story was screen recorded so that it would remain accessible to everyone.

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